THIS WEEK IN STEM HISTORY: Jacques Cousteau was born

You might recognize the name, but who exactly was Jacques-Yves Cousteau? Do you know why is he an important figure in STEM history?

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Jacques Cousteau

born June 11, 1910

Jacques-Yves Cousteau was a French naval officer, oceanographer, marine biologist and ocean explorer, known for his extensive underseas investigations. He was co-inventor of the aqualung which made SCUBA diving possible (1943). Cousteau also developed the Conshelf series of manned habitats, the Diving Saucer, a process of underwater television and numerous other platforms as well as specialized instruments of ocean science.

 In 1945 Cousteau founded the French Navy's Undersea Research Group. and in 1950, he modified a WWII wooden hull British Yard Minesweeper into the research vessel named  Calypso . This became his laboratory until 1996.  Calypso  carried advanced equipment, including one- and two-man mini submarines developed by Cousteau, diving saucers and underwater scooters. The ship was also fitted with a see-through "nose" and an observation chamber to observe below the waterline, and was modified to house scientific equipment and a helicopter pad. The Calypso underwater camera (also concieved by Cousteau) was named after this ship.  1942 until his death he produced hundreds of documentaries and starred in several television series that were shown all over the world. He was an inspiration to millions with his underwater adventures and philanthropic spirit. Not a religious man, but he is often quoted regarding what he had witnessed in the waters as being evidence of the existence of God.

In 1945 Cousteau founded the French Navy's Undersea Research Group. and in 1950, he modified a WWII wooden hull British Yard Minesweeper into the research vessel named Calypso. This became his laboratory until 1996. Calypso carried advanced equipment, including one- and two-man mini submarines developed by Cousteau, diving saucers and underwater scooters. The ship was also fitted with a see-through "nose" and an observation chamber to observe below the waterline, and was modified to house scientific equipment and a helicopter pad. The Calypso underwater camera (also concieved by Cousteau) was named after this ship.

1942 until his death he produced hundreds of documentaries and starred in several television series that were shown all over the world. He was an inspiration to millions with his underwater adventures and philanthropic spirit. Not a religious man, but he is often quoted regarding what he had witnessed in the waters as being evidence of the existence of God.